Christian Life & Discipleship

Roman Soldiers in a Public High School

The other week, we Nexwavers got invited to help out with an Easter walk at a public high school here in Perth. The “walk” is set up in the school courtyard with different “stations” of Jesus’ journey, from His last supper with His disciples to the cross, and finally the empty grave to show He rose again. Students walk from one station to the next, and we tell them different parts of the story with props and costumes for each scene.

The guys dressed up as Roman soldiers, looking solemn and official as they took the “Arrest,” “Torture,” and “Crucifixion” stations.

I got the “Last Supper” station, where Jesus ate His last meal with His disciples the night before He died. My friend and I were given a loaf of bread and a glass of grape juice, symbolizing the bread and wine Jesus used that night. As students came through, we asked if they’d ever heard the story of Jesus before or if they knew the meaning of the bread and cup.

Some had never heard this before.

Some had never heard this before. Others said, “Yeah, I’ve been through this, like, five times.”

“Cool.  So what does the bread represent?”

“His body.”

“And what was going to happen to His body?”

Silence. Sometimes a shrug. Sometimes, “I don’t know.”  Occasionally, one ventured, “He was going to die?”

Jesus took our place. He died, so we wouldn’t have to… so we could be forgiven, not condemned or judged.

“Yes. He was going to die for everything anyone has ever done wrong. We all deserve to die for the things we’ve done wrong – whether to others, to God, or in our own thinking about ourselves. But Jesus took our place. He died, so we wouldn’t have to… so we could be forgiven, not judged.”

“Oh!”  Understanding lightened their faces, as they began to see – some for the first time – who Jesus is and what He’s done.

We continued throughout recess and lunch, and more and more students passed through. At the last station, “The Empty Grave,” we gave out Easter eggs and Bibles for all who wanted them. Over 40 students heard about Jesus that day. Several took Bibles. And about 20 of them slipped papers with their names in a box for those wanting to talk more with the chaplain later.

God can work wonders, even with a loaf of bread and a glass of grape juice!

This has definitely been one of my favourite highlights since working in high schools – getting to share about Jesus with over 40 students, through simply explaining the meaning of the bread and cup. God can work wonders, even with a loaf of bread and a glass of grape juice!